News & Events

Brookings Institute
03/19/2014
With millions more Americans now eligible for health insurance coverage, health care organizations and providers throughout the U.S. are experiencing increasing pressure to balance the growing demand for health care services. At the same time, providers are being asked to improve quality and lower costs. Further complicating this challenge is that the health care workforce is facing significant shortages of physicians, nurses, and other critical roles. In response, organizations are already beginning to think creatively about how to adapt their business model and operations to deliver more efficient, high-quality care.
The Hill - Congress Blog
03/13/2014
In the last few years, growth in healthcare spending has begun to moderate, fueled in part by Medicare’s shift toward new forms of payment based on outcomes and quality. But short-sighted regulations proposed last week would impose dramatic cuts to Medicare Advantage (MA) that may stifle this exciting transformation. Many of the new cost-containment strategies now underway in original Medicare were pioneered in Medicare Advantage. The models for the Affordable Care Act (ACA)’s Accountable Care Organizations were integrated delivery systems like Intermountain, Kaiser Permanente and Geisinger, which all operated MA plans. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation is currently testing a nurse-led care coordination program in nursing homes that is strikingly similar to United Healthcare’s Evercare program. And under the so-called Dual-Eligibles Demonstrations, states, Medicaid and Medicare are working together to implement the successful chronic care strategies pioneered by specialized MA Special Needs Plans like SCAN Health Plan, Caremore and XL Health.
Medpage Today
02/24/2014
Some analysts say it makes no sense to cut payments to a popular program. "Our concern is that if the program is not sustainably funded, it may not be able to keep up with a demand that is only going to increase," wrote Douglas Holtz-Eakin and Kenneth Thorpe, co-chairs of the Partnership for the Future of Medicare, a bipartisan group that advocates for programs to make Medicare secure. In their Feb. 11 letter to Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Administrator Marilyn Tavenner, Eakin and Thorpe also wrote "our fear is that additional cuts to the [Medicare Advantage] program in 2015 could mean that millions of [Medicare Advantage] beneficiaries will lose access to their preferred health plans and doctors and drive more beneficiaries into the flawed fee-for-service system."
The Washington Post/Kaiser Health News
02/21/2014
Some analysts say it makes no sense to cut payments to a popular program. “Our concern is that if the program is not sustainably funded, it may not be able to keep up with a demand that is only going to increase,” wrote Douglas Holtz-Eakin and Kenneth Thorpe, co-chairs of the Partnership for the Future of Medicare, a bipartisan group that advocates for programs to make Medicare secure. In their Feb. 11 letter to Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Administrator Marilyn Tavenner, Eakin and Thorpe also wrote “our fear is that additional cuts to the [Medicare Advantage] program in 2015 could mean that millions of [Medicare Advantage] beneficiaries will lose access to their preferred health plans and doctors and drive more beneficiaries into the flawed fee-for-service system.”

Pages